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History's Bestsellers in Translation Part II: Nonfiction
Cali Kopczick
October 20, 2014 (0)

China/Seattle/Reykjavík: Ryan Boudinot on Seattle as a Global City of Literature
Cali Kopczick
October 8, 2014 (0)

BuzzFeed Article - 8 Reasons Japanese Ghosts Make Terrible Roommates
Cali Kopczick
September 23, 2014 (0)

History's Bestsellers in Translation Part I: Fiction
Cali Kopczick
September 9, 2014 (0)

Ramen Revisited: Tips from Ken Taya aka Enfu
Cali Kopczick
September 2, 2014 (0)

Kodawari Can Render the Prosaic Profound
Cali Kopczick
August 27, 2014 (0)

Before the Summer Runs Out: A Road Trip Proposal
Cali Kopczick
August 19, 2014 (12)

The High Art of Smelling Books
Cali Kopczick
August 4, 2014 (1)

Pike Place Location Opening and Lizard Telepathy Fox Telepathy Open House
Staff
July 28, 2014 (1)

Indie Book Publisher Opens Office/Retail Space in Seattle’s Pike Place Market
Press Release
July 16, 2014 (0)

Q&A with "A Commonplace Book of Pie" Author Kate Lebo and Illustrator Jessica Lynn Bonin
David Jacobson
Oct. 9, 2013 (0)

A Broadside for Mardi Gras
Bruce Rutledge
February 12, 2013 (0)

Oprah Outs Armstrong; Irvin Mayfield Next?
Rex Noone
January 26, 2013 (0)

Friends of CMP
Bruce Rutledge
November 21, 2012 (0)

Nippon-NOLA challenge: week 3
Bruce Rutledge
October 24, 2012 (2)

The NOLA-Nippon challenge: week 2
Bruce Rutledge
October 6, 2012, 2012 (0)

The NOLA-Nippon challenge
Bruce Rutledge
September 24, 2012 (2)

Infusing Nonfiction with Truth: American True Stories
Bruce Rutledge talks to Michael Rozek
June 29, 2012 (1)

Questions rain down on NOLA
Bruce Rutledge
June 18, 2012 (0)

En-Joying Kanji: A Review of Eve Kushner’s Joy o’ Kanji
David Jacobson
May 24, 2012 (1)

Michael Rozek Redefines Nonfiction
Bruce Rutledge
April 19, 2012 (3)

Viewed Sideways: a collection of essays by Donald Richie
D. Michael Ramirez II
December 30, 2011 (0)

New Orleans Book Fest
Bruce
November 4, 2011 (0)

Review: The Beautiful One Has Come (Suzanne Kamata)
D. Michael Ramirez II
August 12, 2011 (0)

The JET Program's Finest Hour
David Jacobson
July 9, 2011 (0)

And the winner is ...
Bruce Rutledge
July 5, 2011 (0)

An even dozen: slow books in a fast world
Bruce Rutledge
June 29, 2011 (1)

Last Chapter for an Island Bookstore?
David Jacobson
June 24, 2011 (0)

More than just another 'Kawaii' face
Bruce Rutledge
June 16, 2011 (0)

Hurricane Story - Free Offer!
Dave Jacobson
June 9, 2011 (0)

Books for Katrina-hit New Orleans Schools
David Jacobson
May 25, 2011 (0)

Todd Shimoda wins Hawaii's top literary award
Chin Music Press
April 12, 2011 (1)

"The Apprenticeship of Big Toe P": A Review
Will Eells
March 28, 2011 (0)

A great sorrow
Bruce Rutledge
March 25, 2011 (1)

Blog Entry
Oprah Outs Armstrong; Irvin Mayfield Next?
Rex Noone
January 26, 2013

Now that Oprah has revealed Louis Armstrong’s use of performance-enhancing drugs, all jazz music has been placed into question.

With this revelation, one can only wonder how authentic any musical performances are (or have been). The idea that any musician could have been “doping” forces one to re-assess the history of jazz music.

Dizzy Gillespie’s prolific cheeks are certainly the result of an extended use of human growth hormone, as obvious an example as Barry Bonds’ head. One wonders if be-bop may have been entirely the outcome of steroids, causing the musicians to hit an inordinate number of notes. It may be shocking for some listeners, but we may simply have to accept the idea that Charlie Parker was on performance-enhancing drugs of some kind.

Certainly, with the fact of Armstrong’s use, no one should be allowed into the Jazz Hall of Fame, if there were such a thing. Certainly not on the first ballot.

It hurts me to write this piece, although I know it may sound naďve to be so shocked. After all, James Baldwin wrote about such a possibility in “Sonny’s Blues,” a story about a musician who uses performance-enhancing drugs.

All we can do is call for testing of all jazz musicians. We cannot allow the authenticity of the music to be drawn into question. The notes must be hit authentically, not with chemical help.

We in New Orleans should be the first to test, just as we were the first to play the music. Thanks to the news of Louis Armstrong’s use, we can now look forward and make sure, as much as possible, that jazz is clean.

I propose that we begin in the French Quarter, on Bourbon Street, where even the casual passerby can scent the possibility of a urine test.

We must begin testing immediately, to preserve the integrity of the music.

Irvin Mayfield, we are coming for you.



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